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2 edition of Central auditory system activity and development in children who use cochlear implants. found in the catalog.

Central auditory system activity and development in children who use cochlear implants.

Karen Ann Gordon

Central auditory system activity and development in children who use cochlear implants.

by Karen Ann Gordon

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Published .
Written in English


About the Edition

Infants with early-onset severe to profound deafness are deprived of auditory stimulation until they receive a cochlear implant. Auditory input is achieved by electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve. I asked: (1) Does early-onset deafness impact the central auditory pathways? (2) Will the duration of early-onset deafness affect the system"s ability to respond to electrical stimulation? (3) Can the pathways change in response to chronic stimulation? and (4) If plasticity exists, is it limited by the age at implantation?In answer to the questions posed, I found, first, that most children at initial device activation had recognizable ECAP and EABR responses (89% and 94%, respectively) but only 32% had detectable EMLRs. Second, initial ECAP and EABR wave latencies and amplitudes had no significant relationship with age at implantation whereas EMLR detectability was better, wave latencies shorter, and wave amplitudes larger in children implanted at ≥5 years compared to their younger peers. Thus, early-onset deafness and its duration influence thalamocortical responses but not auditory nerve or brainstem responses. Third, significant decreases in latencies and increases in amplitudes of all responses and increased EMLR detectability were found with ongoing implant use reflecting activity-dependent changes along the central auditory pathways promoted by implant use. Fourth, the ECAP and EABR changes were not significantly related to the age at implantation and showed some similarities to changes in the normal acoustically evoked brainstem response. Increases in EMLR detectability tended to be more subtle in children implanted between 8--17 years than changes in younger children. Age and/or duration of deafness therefore affect thalamo-cortical responses more strongly than responses from more peripheral areas.Electrically evoked potentials of the auditory nerve (ECAP), brainstem (EABR) and thalamo-cortex (EMLR), were collected repeatedly in 50 children with early-onset deafness (5.4 +/- 4.0 years); recordings were made at implant surgery, initial device activation and at regular times over the first year of implant use. Responses were also collected from 31 children (6.3 +/- 3.0 years at implantation, 5.3 +/- 2.9 years of implant experience) and in 11 adults (implanted at 42.5 +/- 7.5 years, 4.5 +/- 2.9 years of implant use).

The Physical Object
Pagination251 leaves.
Number of Pages251
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19475670M
ISBN 100494028521

Conclusions: Our data suggest a high degree of plasticity of the central auditory pathways after early bilateral implantation. We find that P1 latencies provide a clinically useful biomarker of central auditory system development in children after cochlear implantation. The use of cochlear implants to restore hearing in profoundly deaf children is increasing, with a trend toward earlier implantation. Input to the central auditory system through a cochlear.

In children with pre- or peri-lingual deafness, a period of auditory deprivation occurs during potentially sensitive times in development. In the present study, we aimed to determine the effect of early-onset deafness on auditory nerve and brainstem activity, the potential for plasticity in the human auditory system, and whether a sensitive or critical period exists in auditory brainstem. Conclusion: Our findings showed that CI influences the auditory system which can be measured in CAEPs. Keywords: Cochlear implantation, Cortical auditory evoked potentials, Children. Accepted on Octo Introduction Sensory deprivation caused by hearing loss leads to severe impairment of speech and language development in children.

  In the present paper, we review what is currently known about the effects of deafness on the developing human auditory system and ask: Without use, does the immature auditory system lose the ability to normally function and mature? Any change to the structure or function of the auditory pathways resulting from a lack of activity will have important implications for future use through an. The lack of development of the central auditory system in congenitally deaf children implanted after 7 years is correlated with relatively poor development of speech and language skills [Geers.


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Central auditory system activity and development in children who use cochlear implants by Karen Ann Gordon Download PDF EPUB FB2

Methods. Three children with bilateral congenital hearing loss and a unilateral CI, aged below years, participated in a longitudinal study. Children were tested at three time points after cochlear implantation using the Polish Children Development Scale (CDS) consisting of a comprehensive battery of tests, as well as recordings of Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials (CAEP).Cited by: 1.

Cochlear implants bypass the damaged cochlea by directly stimulating the central nervous system, providing a window into the development of the central auditory system.

Converging evidence from studies of deaf animals and children fitted with cochlear implants have allowed us to delineate the characteristics and time course of deprivation Cited by: 1.

Sharma A, Donnan M, Spahr A. A sensitive period for the development of the central auditory system in children with cochlear implants: Implications for age of implantation. Ear & Hearing.

; – Sharma A, Kraus N, McGee TJ, Nicol TG. Developmental changes in PI and N1 central auditory responses elicited by consonant-vowel by: Central Auditory Evoked Potentials in all three children (Child 1, Child 2 and Child 3) at subsequent assessment points: 1st month (M1), 5th month (M5), 9th month (M9) after cochlear implant.

The lack of development of the central auditory system in con- genitally deaf children implanted after 7 years is correlated with relatively poor development of speech and language skills [Geers.

Major determinants of the sensitive period for central auditory development in congenitally deaf children who receive cochlear implants. (a) In normal development, the period of intrinsically. If there is a brief sensitive period for central auditory system development, it is reasonable to suppose that brain activity in the auditory cortex would differ substantially in deaf children deprived of sound for a long period of time and in children deprived of sound for a short period.

Sharma, A., Dorman, M.F., & Spahr, A.J. (b). A sensitive period for the development of the central auditory system in children with cochlear implants: implications for age of implantation. Ear and Hearing 23(6), – PubMed CrossRef Google Scholar.

Early latency cortical activity follows a normal-like developmental trajectory with time-in-sound experience. • Differences from normal emerge in later latency cortical activity despite long-term chronic stimulation of the auditory system for up to 16 years, in children using cochlear implants to hear.

Sharma A, Dorman MF. Central auditory development in children with cochlear implants: Clinical implications. Adv Otorhinolaryngol. ; – Sharma A, Dorman MF, Kral A. The influence of a sensitive period on central auditory development in children with unilateral and bilateral cochlear implants.

Hear Res. a; (1–2)– developing central auditory nervous system. The same sensitive period and time course for normalization of the central auditory evoked potential is now known to exist for the second implanted ear.6 One study found that children receiving early simultaneous bilateral cochlear.

–By this year, people have publicly received the House Cochlear Audio Implants, which have been implanted by 36 different clinics. The 3M Cochlear Implant System. House Design for use in adults, which is already in hundreds of adults, receives FDA approval in Nov.

Sharma A, Dorman MF, Spahr AJ. A sensitive period for the development of the central auditory system in children with Cochlear implants: implications for age of implantation. Ear Hear. ; – doi: / INTERVENTION: Cortical auditory evoked potential was completed to determine the latency of the P1 response in 4 children with bilateral cochlear implants.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Longitudinal development of the latency of the P1 cortical auditory evoked potential in children who received bilateral cochlear implants prior to age 2 years. Bilateral cochlear implantation is implantation on both sides, or the use of two cochlear implants.

The advantages of hearing implants for the development of children with hearing loss have been demonstrated in numerous clinical studies. 1,2,3 These studies show that some children receive unique benefits from bilateral cochlear implantation which may help them to develop listening skills, such.

The P1 response has been measured in deaf children who received cochlear implants at different ages to examine the limits of plasticity in the central auditory system (Ponton et al.,Ponton and Eggermont,Sharma et al.,Sharma et al., a, Sharma et al., b, Sharma et al., ).Sharma and Dorman () examined P1 latency in congenitally deaf children fit.

In our previous studies, children with mutations in any of the three common deafness genes displayed better auditory performance after 3 years of CI use [17,18]. Table 1 Review of studies on language/speech outcomes in cochlear implanted patients with mutations in GJB2, SLC26A4 or the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene.

Objective The aim of the present experiment was to assess the consequences of cochlear implantation at different ages on the development of the human central auditory system. Design Our measure of the maturity of central auditory pathways was the latency of the P1 cortical auditory evoked potential.

Because P1 latencies vary as a function of chronological age, they can be used to infer the. INTRODUCTION. Cochlear implantation has revolutionized the care for children and adults with deafness.

The first surgery for implantation of a single channel cochlear implant (CI) occurred inby House and Doyle, and was followed by the first multichannel CI in 1 In the intervening six decades, the goals for CI recipients' sound perception have advanced and continue to be refined.

They then remain constant or change very slowly over months or years. The lack of development of the central auditory system in congenitally deaf children implanted after 7 years is correlated with relatively poor development of speech and language skills [Geers, this vol, pp ].

Good technology and consistent use is a critical factor in the natural development of auditory skills, but cannot guarantee progress of skill development without specific attention. Early literacy is primarily based on auditory skills making attention in this area a priority.• Early Intervention for Children with Cochlear Implants: A Paradigm Shift in Expectations • Changes in Human Central Auditory Development Caused by Deafness in Early Childhood • Beyond the Documentary: Peter Artinian’s Perspectives on Cochlear Implants and Sound and Fury • Cochlear Implantation and the Deaf Community • Personality.We examined the longitudinal development of the cortical auditory evoked potential (CAEP) in 21 children who were fitted with unilateral cochlear implants and in two children who were fitted with bilateral cochlear implants either before age years or after age 7 years.

The age cut-offs (7 years for late-implanted) were based on the sensitive period for.